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New to Programming in Industry? I Need Your Help

I'm working on a book for people new to programming in industry. My reader may be:

  • A college student looking to become a professional programmer, wondering what school's not teaching them;

  • A recent grad who's working but has noticed that there's a lot more to professional work than what you learned in school;

  • Someone coming to programming from a completely different field, who got their feet wet and now wants to make programming a career.

Is this you? Yes? Let's talk. I'm putting together an advisory panel of "target audience" readers, whose goal is to make sure I'm answering your questions. The scope of this topic is nearly infinite; the number of pages I've got to make a high-impact book is not. I need to keep it tight and focused on the topics that are most useful to you.

In return for your help, you'll get early access to chapters as I write them. I'll try to swing a copy of the paper book for you, too, when it's printed.

Interested? Send me an email.

Comments

This actually sounds quite interesting. I just finished my undergraduate degree at Lawrence Technological University in Southfield, Michigan and I know from first-hand experience that many of the programming books out there are complete crap. With the exception of the excellent O'Reilley Media books, none have adequately, clearly, or deeply explained the topics they were supposed to cover. Keep me informed as to the continued effort of this project.

I'll be honest that I think O'Reilly consistently produces B grade books. You can be sure buying O'reilly that the book will not be a mistake. Most of the books I consider great, A grade books, on my shelf are either Addison Wesley or Morgan Kaufman.

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